Since many of us have been there…

“Please know there are much better things in life than being lonely or liked or bitter or mean or self-conscious. We are all full of shit. Go love someone just because; I know your heart may be badly bruised, or even the victim of numerous knifings, but it will always heal, even if you don’t want it to; it keeps going. There are the most fantastic, beautiful things and people out there, I promise. It is up to you to find them.”
Chuck Palahniuk

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“Jim Jarmusch once told me Fast, Cheap, and Good… pick two. If it’s fast and cheap it won’t be good. If it’s cheap and good, it won’t be fast. If it’s fast and good, it won’t be cheap. Fast, cheap and good … pick two words to live by.”
Tom Waits

•C R A F T S M A N S H I P•

Remember when people made things? When people took pride in hard work and working with their hands. Remember when some worked hard enough and honed their craft well enough to be called craftsmen?
That was long before people described them as being JUST a mechanic, a welder or carpenter….Or farmer. It was when an honest, hard fought living was honorable and respected. No one came out of school expecting to be handed a high paying job because they were entitled to it or because they arrived out of higher education. They earned what was given to them.
I wonder if we’re better off? I wonder if we value what we have more. I wonder if we know how to still build things, innovate and work hard for something great.
I’m smart enough and educated enough to sit behind a desk and stare into a computer for hours a day, wearing a suit and having wads of cash thrown at me. Theres nothing wrong with that. We need people to do that and their work is valuable. I just choose dirty hands, creating beautiful things from raw materials and honing the craft.

Via http://thewildandfreelife.tumblr.com/post/44432993080/remember-when-people-made-things-when-people-took

There is a time for everything.

When is it time to persevere, work harder, fight the battle, win the war?

And when is it time to take a break?

And when is it time to surrender, give up and abandon?

Right now I’m experiencing such an odd sense of peace/relief. My plans have not succeeded within the anticipated timeline. I have achieved/completed many items on the to-do list which means I would’ve ready for another attempt at shorter notice.

My questions are as above. I drive myself hard to achieve something, so much so that my vision and mission becomes acute, and usually failure is not an option. An interjection here: “failure” to me means no achieving what I set out to do-giving up; failure in its ultimate sense. Why set out in the first place? My ability to persevere and endure for so long has a downfall… I get tunnel vision after a while, when I gain momentum. That scene in X-men comes to mind where the Juggernaut begins bolting through walls as if they weren’t there and then collides with one that’s actually impenetrable (because of the mutant that strips all mutations).

How do you measure what is too far and too little? How do you know when to persevere and when to submit? How do you know when to push the limits and when not to?

•S H E•

“Does she scare you a little? Good. She should make you fear her love, so that when she lets you be apart of it, you won’t take it lightly. She should remind you of the power that beauty brings, that storms reside in her veins, and that she still wants you in the middle of it all. Do not take this soul for granted, for she is fierce, and she can take you places that you never thought you could go; but she is still loving in the midst of it all, like the calm rain after a storm, she can bring life. Learn her, and cherish her, respect her, and love her; for she is so much more than a pretty face, she is a soul on fire.”
T.B. LaBerge // Things I’m still learning at 25

“It would be part of my scheme of physical education that every youth in the State
—from the King’s son downwards—
should learn to do something finely and thoroughly with his hand,
so as to let him know what touch meant;
and what stout craftsmanship meant;
and to inform him of many things besides,
which no man can learn but by some severely accurate discipline in doing.
Let him once learn to take a straight shaving off a plank,
or draw a fine curve without faltering,
or lay a brick level in its mortar;
and he has learned a multitude of other matters which no lips of man could ever teach him.”

John Ruskin
Time and Tide by Weare and Tyne :
Twenty-five letters to a working man of Sunderland on the Law of Work – (London) 1867